Feeds

VMware puts a price on NSX and tells partners to open fire

Indoctrination phase complete: let the selling begin!

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

VMware's NSX network virtualisation software has been added to the company's price list, a small-but-important milestone that sees the product available to resellers for the first time.

Virtzilla announced NSX last August and released it in October of the same year, but until now has only sold it direct to customers. VMware swears that decision wasn't taken to leave it with the juiciest and lowest-hanging fruit. Instead, the company says it was a necessary first step because a new product category isn't something you can just drop into the channel's lap and expect they'll be able to sell.

In the case of NSX, VMware has unashamedly said it doesn't expect anyone to understand the product immediately. It has therefore spent rather a lot of time since NSX's launch filling whiteboards in company with both customers and partners to help them understand network virtualisation and its place in the software-defined data centre. With that indoctrination phase complete, the time to give NSX a public price partners can dangle beneath customers' noses has arrived.

Not every VMware partner will hit the streets looking for NSX customers. Those that do will will almost always hold the company's Elite status, a rarified tier occupied by only 10 companies. Others that offer the product will, according to VMware Australia's Aaron Steppat, offer “multiple practices” to their customers. Such broad competency is needed because successful NSX implementations will need to touch on many parts of the data centre, so would-be implementers need to understand not just NSX but also how it works alongside the many other pieces of infrastructure and software that networks touch.

By now you may be wondering if, seeing as we mentioned price back in the first sentence, we will ever get around to revealing it.

Without further ado, NSX comes in three cuts:

  • A subscription version priced at $AUD550 ($US517 or £304) per virtual machine, per year;
  • A licence for an add-on to the enterprise version of the vCloud Suite, at $AUD4700 ($US4,420 or £2,600) per CPU;
  • NSX for vSphere at $AUD8,065 per CPU ($US7,585 or £4,464).

Lest those prices raise eyebrows, VMware is at pains to point out that its vision for NSX is that it will deliver without the need for new networking hardware. That's in contrast to other network virtualisation frameworks that suggest new boxen built for purpose are the best way to hand the control plane over to servers. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.