Feeds

Entirely new trojan quietly wheeled into black hat forums

Pandemiya is 25,000 lines of original password-pinching botnet badassery

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

An RSA researcher claims to have found an entirely new trojan during his trawls of the criminal underground.

RSA researcher Eli Marcus says the "Pandemiya" trojan comprises about 25,000 lines of fresh code. With most malware based on proven platforms, entirely new code is a rarity.

Pandemiya is nasty: it infects Windows PCs, steals data from forms, creates fake web pages and takes screen shots to send back to the botmasters who deploy it.

The software is modular and pervasive, and unique thanks to its ability to inject itself into all new processes via the Windows security registry function CreateProcess API.

It even has an upgrade path: Marcuswrites that a US$1,500 version offers basic functions but a US$2,000 cut allows .dll file plug-ins to enhance its functionality. A Facebook attack module is reportedly in the works.

"The advent of a freshly coded new trojan malware application is not too common in the underground," Marcus writes, adding that the modular approach means Pandemiya could become "more pervasive in the near future."

Pandemiya can also sign off botnet files, a trick Marcus said helped prevent hijacking and analysis by cops and security bods. Dynamic encrypted communications help it to dodge network analysers.

Like other trojans, Pandemiya is foisted on machines through exploit kits and drive-by infections that target vulnerabilities in buggy wares such as Java, Silverlight and Flash.

Marcus speculated the trojan was relatively unknown until now due to its high price and new-kid-on-the-block status compared to the likes of Zeus and Citadel.

The good news is that Pandemiya can be removed with a little registry-tweaking and command line action. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.