Feeds

L337 crackrz use dumb passwords too

Haxxors hope 'hack' stops them from being hacked

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Black hats are just as blithe about the passwords they use as the rest of the world, according to a bit of research by security outfit Avast.

The anti-virus company's Antonín Hýža, writes here that after he'd built a dictionary of hacked hackers' passwords, the most common password was “hack”.

Hýža says his work began because he had the job of decoding a PHP shell without the key. Rather than try to brute force the shell, he figured that building a dictionary of hackers' passwords would accelerate the process. So he raided the company's samples of backdoors, bots and shells, some of which “are protected with a password encoded in MD5, SHA1 or in plain text”.

With 40,000 samples in hand, Hýža said, “nearly 2,000 were unique and 1,255 of those were in plain text”. Short passwords hashed in MD5 were easy to crack, and yielded another 348 samples, and the total is what he analysed to build his dictionary. Here's some other highlights:

  • 59 per cent of passwords used only characters – no numbers or special symbols
  • Only six per cent included non-alphanumeric character;
  • Many of the samples in the analysis used default passwords like r57, c99, password or yourpass.

Hýža says the dictionary also yielded a couple of handy character sets for when he had to apply brute force to a password: acdehiklmnorstu01234579!-.@_ and acdehiklmnorstubgpxyw0123456789!-.@_#$+*{space} – and interestingly, when he had to resort to brute force, in all cases the passwords were six characters or fewer.

Perhaps Vulture South's favourite example of passwords Hýža found was lol dont try cracking 12 char+ – which was stored in plain text. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
One HUNDRED FAMOUS LADIES exposed NUDE online
Celebrity women victimised as Apple iCloud accounts reportedly popped
Rubbish WPS config sees WiFi router keys popped in seconds
Another day, another way in to your home router
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
Three quarters of South Korea popped in online gaming raids
Records used to plunder game items, sold off to low lifes
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.