Feeds

Windows 8 leaker gets three months, booted back to Russia

Bulk of jail time already served

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

Alex Kibkalo, the former Microsoft worker who pleaded guilty in April to leaking company secrets, is likely headed back to his native Russia in a week or so, having been sentenced to serve a brief stint in prison.

According to court documents, Kibkalo was formally sentenced on Tuesday to a three-month prison term, per his plea agreement.

It was earlier reported that Kibkalo had also agreed to repay Microsoft $22,500 in damages, but no restitution was specified in the final judgment. Rather, US District Judge John Coughenour ticked a box indicating that "the defendant is financially unable and is unlikely to become able to pay a fine and, accordingly, the imposition of a fine is waived."

Kibkalo was arrested on March 19 and has remained incarcerated ever since, meaning he has already served most of his custodial sentence and is due to be released next week.

That doesn't mean he's free to come and go as he pleases, though. In fact, only the "go" part is allowed, as US authorities plan to deport him once his sentence is served.

A Russian national, Kibkalo worked for Microsoft for seven years in offices in Russia and Lebanon. After receiving a poor performance report, he reportedly became disgruntled and leaked prerelease Windows 8 software to an unnamed French blogger.

Unfortunately for Kibkalo, the blogger's chosen email service was Microsoft's own Hotmail. After being alerted to the leak, Redmond's so-called Trustworthy Computing Investigations department scoured the blogger's Hotmail inbox and MSN chat records to identify Kibkalo, a move that rankled privacy advocates and eventually led to Microsoft altering its Hotmail terms of service.

The FBI eventually arrested Kibkalo – who reportedly holds advanced degrees in economics and mathematics and can speak seven languages – in Seattle, where he was working at a local software company on a visa.

According to online newspaper Seattlepi.com, in a letter to the court following his sentencing, Kibkalo said he was "given good lessons" by the experience and plans to write a book about it upon his return to Russia. ®

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.