Feeds

Container-friendly Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 hits general availability

Could be fastest-adopted release ever, completely objective company claims

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

On Tuesday, Red Hat announced general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, a version that it immodestly claims will "redefine the enterprise operating system."

Following the typical six-month beta cycle and a release candidate that shipped in April, RHEL 7 delivers an enterprise-grade distribution of many of the latest technologies from the Linux world, plus various enhancements and upgrades from previous versions of the OS.

Perhaps most notably, the new version offers improved support for Linux containers, including Docker. RHEL first added Docker support in version 6.5 in November, and Shadowman has been collaborating with Docker since its 0.7 release to improve its storage and code-execution drivers.

In addition, XFS is now the default file system for RHEL 7, rather than Ext4, meaning the OS can now support volumes of up to 500TB.

The new release also introduces the ability to integrate with Active Directory domains for better interoperability in Windows environments, and it supports OpenLMI for easier management.

Red Hat has been enhancing its own, unique contributions to its distro, as well. The installer has been improved with a new GUI, but more importantly, for the first time Shadowman is offering a set of tools that can analyze existing RHEL 6 servers and advise admins on the appropriate migration procedure. What can be automated is automated, and where manual intervention is necessary, admins are directed to the appropriate documentation.

In a webcast introducing the new release on Tuesday, Jim Totton, VP of Red Hat's platform business unit, said that based on feedback from beta participants – 62 per cent of which said they planned to start migrating to RHEL 7 in the next six months – Red Hat believes this will be one of the most quickly adopted versions in its history.

For those who don't plan to migrate right away, however, the company said at its annual Red Hat Summit in April that it still plans to offer a RHEL 6.6 maintenance release, even as work on RHEL 8 is already underway.

Because Red Hat offers its software under a subscription model, RHEL 7 is available immediately for deployment by all current customers. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.