Feeds

Facial recognition tech convicts man in Chicago robbery case

Handed 22 year sentence after being spotted in surveillance footage

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

A Chicago man has received a 22-year prison sentence after becoming the first person to be convicted with evidence from the city's facial recognition technology.

Pierre Martin was sentenced Monday for a pair of armed robberies carried out on the Chicago Transit Authority train system. The incidents occurred in January and February of last year, just weeks before Martin would make headlines as the first criminal to be fingered using facial recognition software.

Using a system based on the NEC NeoFace recognition tool, police in Chicago compared surveillance footage from the trains with a database of 4.5 million police mug shots. When Martin's face was identified using a previous mug shot, police were able to make an arrest and later add witness statements.

The arrest was the first to be attributed to the NeoFace system since Chicago police began using the tool in early 2013.

Image via Chicago Sun Times

Pierre Martin, via Chicago Sun Times

Last month, the 35-year-old Martin was convicted of the February charge, following which he pleaded guilty to the earlier charge, for which he will not have to serve any additional time.

"This case is a great example that these high-tech tools are helping to enhance identification and lead us to defendants that might otherwise evade capture," state attorney Anita Alvarez told the Chicago Sun Times.

NEC pitches its NeoFace platform as a tool for government security and border control agencies. The company says that the suite is able to more reliably compare and analyze faces by breaking images down into smaller segments which are then compared and matched.

While the facial recognition tool won the approval of authorities in this case, activist groups remain wary of facial recognition and other biometric identification tools. Concerned over possible privacy concerns, civil rights groups have sought to closely examine proposed government biometric databases and identification tools for law enforcement. ®

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.