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Migrating to Windows Server 2012

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Reg Live TV What are you doing on 14 July 2015? Mark it in your diary: it’s the end of support for Windows Server 2003. Unless you start migration planning soon, 14 July next year might be a bad day at the office.

Migrating to the latest version of Windows Server isn’t just a case of installing a new OS. You need to discover which servers are still running Windows Server 2003, categorise your apps, consider the cloud, upgrade hardware, improve management - as well as perform the migration.

That’s a lot of moving parts, but we’re here to help. The Reg has been working with Microsoft, Intel and HP to create a Regcast to guide you through the steps to help you make the best migration decisions for your business.

So, if you are still running Windows Server 2003, you need to join us on 17 June at 11:00 BST, when we will guide you through the process, with the help of Julius Davies, from Microsoft, and Tony Lock, from Freeform Dynamics. The Reg’s Tim Phillips will be putting your questions to the panel.

Don’t miss this Regcast: your data centre needs you.

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