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Myspace: Where are you going? We still have all your HUMILIATING PICS

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Remember those regrettable party photos you snapped during spring-break in 2005?

Myspace does. And the once-massive social network isn't above waving them about if it means getting you to come back and check out its redesigned music portal.

The company has recently been sending users an email message (as first reported by Mashable) containing photos from their old forgotten account pages. Reading "Your Photos, Redelivered" the message suggests users return to the site in order to view "the good, the rad and the what were you thinking..."

The move, it seems, is an effort by Myspace (formerly MySpace) to harken back to its roots as a social network and extended friend circle of Tom Anderson.

The company shot to popularity after its launch in 2003, only to flame out over the course of the decade and eventually drift into obscurity as rival Facebook first drew away its student crowd and eventually the rest of Myspace's user base. Sold to Newscorp for $580m in 2005, the company was resold for $35m just six years later.

Left as something of a virtual ghost town by 2011, Myspace was able to carry on in a much smaller form as many independent bands and musical acts maintained a presence on the platform. The music angle would eventually spark a purchase of the site from a group lead by Justin Timberlake, followed by an attempt to relaunch as an online music portal and music-industry news site. Myspace now claims to house over 53 million songs from 14.2 million artist-profile pages.

The site also, ironically, maintains an active presence on Facebook.

Those goings on, however, did not reach many of Myspace's former users who may have abandoned the site a half decade ago or more, and have since forgotten about their profiles or assumed that content had since been taken down.

While the company has deleted some of the content from its social networking past, such as user blog posts, it seems many user photos remain alive and well on the service.

Myspace didn't have much to say about the matter – they did not respond to our request for comment on its latest campaign.

Publicity push or not, if you think you still have photos from a forgotten MySpace-era account, it might be worth heading back into the site to delete them once and for all. Best to make sure that no potential future employer, partner, or friend is able to dig up any lingering evidence of that night you drank cinnamon schnapps and got sick at the Jimmy Eat World concert. ®

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