Feeds

Pirate Party runs aground in European Parliamentary elections

Down from two MEPs to one but founder claims 'strong improvement'

The Power of One Infographic

Update Voters have not been entirely kind to The Pirate Party in elections for the European Parliament.

Sweden's two Pirate Party European Members of Parliament have not been re-elected, with the local authorities tally suggesting a collapse in the Party's vote to 2.2 per cent, down from 2009's 7.1 per cent.

In Finland, where Pirate Bay founder Peter Sunde sought a seat, counting the Party secured just 0.7 per cent of the vote.

But Germany's Piraten Partei has claimed victory, with candidate Julia Reda set to take win a seat after scoring 1.4 per cent of the vote.

She quickly set out her stall, on Twitter of course, as an opponent of the election's big winners: parties of the right opposed to the very idea of the European Union.

The UK's three Pirate candidates got nowhere near Reda's vote: they appear to have collectively won fewer than 10,000 votes, or just 0.05 per cent of those cast.

The Czech Republic's Česká pirátská strana polled a respectable 4.78 per cent of the vote, but that wasn't enough to secure a seat.

Pirate Party candidates in Greece, Slovenia, Spain and Hungary appear not to have secured sufficient votes to make it out of the “other parties” column in their nations' vote tallies.

Update

Pirate Party founder Richard Falkvinge has suggested the election results represent strong improvement.

Falkvinge's logic is that at the last European elections only one Pirate Party made it onto the ballot paper, but this year saw seven piratical nations try to win a seat and therefore an increased vote across the European Union. That the Czech party just missed out on a seat, and the German Party missed winning a second by a very slim margin, are worth celebrating.

The founder rates this "A painfully slow improvement, since it didn’t result in seats," adding that "the political world tends to be that painfully slow for people coming from the Internet. ®

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.