Feeds

Oracle emerges from bureaucratic sludge clutching crucial cloud certificate

Ellison & co wheel onto US FedRAMP toward public sector

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Oracle has gained a crucial federal certification that will make it easier for US government agencies to buy cloud services from the database giant.

The company announced it had gained a provisional authority to operate under the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) on Thursday, almost a year after cloud rival Amazon gained its certification, eleven months after HP , ten months after IBM, seven months after Microsoft, and two months after VMware announced its own plans to pursue the valuable certification.

FedRAMP is a government-wide certification program that cuts the red tape agencies need to go through when procuring IT services. Once FedRAMP has been granted, other government entities need to go perform fewer specific evaluations on the tech before buying it.

Oracle launched its government cloud services back in September 2013 as part of a reversal by the company on its long-standing dislike of cloud.

By gaining FedRAMP for its "Managed Cloud Services," Oracle will be able to more easily sell government agencies on its strategically important suite of as-a-service tech.

The certification is "a critical milestone in Oracle’s efforts to implement and deploy secure private-cloud environments to our U.S. Government customers and partners," explained Rick Cirigliano, vice president of public sector for Oracle's Managed Cloud Services, in a statement.

Oracle's Managed Cloud Services come in three variants: Applications Managed Cloud Service (a management service "for any Oracle application"), Technology Managed Cloud Service (a way to get Oracle apps into the cloud), and Extended Managed Cloud Service (additional cloud-based services for existing on-premise apps).

With Oracle gaining FedRAMP it has screeched ahead of the current certification laggard, Google, which despite being on an enterprise push for its cloud has yet to gain the valuable slip of paper.

Though all the major IT services companies appear to have pursued or are pursuing certification, there may not be that much of a payoff: the Federal government is predicted to spend a mere $118.3m on public cloud tech this year and $1.83bn on private cloud. Money, yes, but not as much as we imagine these companies are used to. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
VVOL update: Are any vendors NOT leaping into bed with VMware?
It's not yet been released but everyone thinks it's the dog's danglies
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud
Just as Jeff Bezos did to books and CDs, Amazon's rivals are now doing to it
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.