Feeds

Pure Storage's latest arrays cost DOUBLE what it claimed earlier

Hey, who wants a top-spec 250TB FA-450? I dunno, you got $900K?

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Our Pure Storage range expansion story about the firm's FlashArray 400 series arrays prompted a missive from Pure saying that we'd got the price wrong. Which is strange given that we were quoting Pure's own figures.

According to Pure Storage's marketing bods, low-end model pricing for the FA-405 and FA-450 arrays was $6 to $8/GB and not $3 to $4/GB, which we originally reported last week – headline: "Hey, who wants a 40TB all-flash Pure box? I dunno, you got $160k?"

Using the $3 to $4/GB range, as featured in Pure's press release, we calculated the entry-level FA-405 would cost roughly $120,000 to $160,000 for a fully configured, 40TB usable, machine.

Pure said the FA-405 started at a price significantly less than $100,000. Marketeer Max Kixmoeller told The Register:

  • Pure doesn't set end-user "street" pricing since we sell through the channel (this would be illegal)...but we can give you estimates of what end-user pricing is at typical discounts and channel mark-ups. These will vary though by country, reseller, and volume of product purchased. Hence we tend to talk about ranges vs. absolute numbers.
  • Pure markets end-user pricing "starting at $3-$4/GB". This is for our larger systems, as the larger systems amortise the cost of the controllers over a large amount of flash. The more flash you add to a system, the lower the $/GB gets. Smaller systems have a higher $/GB as a result of this, typically in the $6-8/GB range.
  • So, to give you some examples:
    • Our new highest-end system is the FA-450, fully-configured with 250TBs usable, and that goes for $800 to 900K. $900K/250TB = $3.6/GB. Higher discounts would make it less expensive.
    • Our lowest-end system is the FA-405, configured with 10TB usable, which goes for $80-100K. At $80K, that would be $8/GB usable.
    • All the "usable" numbers above include all overhead (RAID, HA, FlashCare Reserve), and add the value of data reduction at typical rates.
  • Customers who buy large systems tend to be more focused on $/GB as the metric they look at, hence the $3-4/GB marketing range we use. Smaller customers tend to be focused on total acquisition cost, hence we say "Systems available for less than $100K”.

By extrapolation, a 40TB FA-405 at $8/GB would cost $360,000 and, at a $6/GB cost, would sting you for $240,000. Not cheap. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
'Kim Kardashian snaps naked selfies with a BLACKBERRY'. *Twitterati gasps*
More alleged private, nude celeb pics appear online
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.