Feeds

AVG on Heartbleed: It's dangerous to go alone. Take this (an AVG tool)

Thousands of websites still spilling their crypto blood on carpets everywhere

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

It's the bug that keeps on bleeding. Thousands of websites are still vulnerable to Heartbleed more than a month after a patch for the password-leaking OpenSSL bug was released, we're told.

Researchers at AVG’s Virus Labs said they scanned Alexa's league table of the top 800,000 sites in the world, and found 12,043 (1.5 per cent) are still vulnerable. The bods also said some government-run websites in Asia and Brazil may be at risk.

Other security experts reckon AVG's figures are in line with their own surveys of the web.

"They [AVG] are close to what I've got," Ivan Ristic, director of engineering at cloud security firm Qualys, told El Reg today. At the end of April, three weeks after the Heartbleed fix was released, he estimated that less than one per cent of websites worldwide were vulnerable to the the data-disclosing bug at that time.

Ristic said SSL Pulse, which probes its own list of popular websites, said 0.8 per cent of surveyed sites were vulnerable in May. "I think the more popular the site, the faster the patching," he added today.

Robert Graham of Errata Security blogged that 1.35 per cent of sites he scanned about two weeks ago were still vulnerable.

Heartbleed is a bug in OpenSSL's implementation of a keep-alive feature in TLS: the flawed functionality was introduced years ago, but only revealed last month: it allows attackers to slowly sift through the memory of a server, router, or other vulnerable device, for sensitive data such as passwords and crypto-keys.

Apropos of nothing, AVG has added a Heartbleed scanner to its freebie AVG Web TuneUp browser tool to alert surfers when visiting a website that may still be affected by the serious flaw. Other consumer-focused Heartbleed warning utilities are available. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Russian hackers exploit 'Sandworm' bug 'to spy on NATO, EU PCs'
Fix imminent from Microsoft for Vista, Server 2008, other stuff
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
Forget passwords, let's use SELFIES, says Obama's cyber tsar
Michael Daniel wants to kill passwords dead
Kill off SSL 3.0 NOW: HTTPS savaged by vicious POODLE
Pull it out ASAP, it is SWISS CHEESE
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.