Feeds

Creepy Facebook urges users to pester friends about their SEX LIVES

Stalking-as-a-service: What the Zuck?

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Facebook users are now encouraged to ask fellow Facebookers to reveal details about their relationships if they haven't already dished the dirt on their love lives.

In other words, by clearing the way for stalker types to ask acquaintances creepy questions, Facebook's data mining just got lazier.

Yes, please do ask me about my relationship. Don't let the fact that I haven't declared it yet dissuade you from pestering (Credit: Mashable)

It really is a tool geared towards very casual friends on the network, because real-life chums would presumably already know if their pal was hooked up with someone, or else single and possibly available for a date.

But, more pertinently, Facebook is urging its vast userbase to help fill in the blanks in its massive database. Some holdouts decline to provide details such as sexual orientation, hometown, phone number and music preferences. That simply doesn't sit right with Zuck, who wants to "connect the world" not for altruistic reasons, but more to scrape as much cash as possible from targeted adverts to please Wall Street.

To achieve that, the free-content ad network needs to gather as much data as it can about the 1.25 billion people who use the site and app at least once a month.

It already started nudging users to ask other users to reveal more about themselves on their profiles in the last few months. But the relationship status, er, poke is the latest tactic to flush more details out of the slightly more privacy-conscious types on the network.

Apparently, the new feature will be rolled out over the next few weeks, so horny Brits can't start flirting with others on Facebook via that method just yet.

Mashable, which has seen the new functionality in action, reports that when someone clicks on the "ask" button, they must also send a question, such as "want to grab a drink sometime?" The user is also prompted to publicly share their relationship status, or else just reveal it to the person creepily doing the asking.

A side effect of all this: it's possible that Facebook is finally getting into the dating game. What next? Might it want to be married to Tinder? ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.