Feeds

Cisco's Chambers to Obama: Stop fiddling with our routers

It's not like the Borg need another thing to slow sales

Website security in corporate America

Cisco chief executive John Chambers has reportedly written to US President Obama, pointing out that the NSA tampering with kit it exports is not likely to result in more customer confidence or higher sales.

The allegation that the NSA intercepts and fiddles with Cisco kit before it can reach offshore customers was raised last week by Edward Snowden's amanuensis Glen Greenwald as he set out to spruik a new tome. Photos of Cisco kit on a workbench somewhere later emerged, giving credence to the story.

Cisco seems to be taking the story seriously enough that, according to the Financial Times (regwalled) Chambers has picked up a fresh sheet of letterhead and despatched it to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue with an angry message to the effect that, to quote the pink pages, “if these allegations are true, these actions will undermine confidence in our industry and in the ability of technology companies to deliver products globally.”

Which doesn't sound like a good way to help US outfits score the exports sales so desirable as it climbs slowly out of the ruins of the global financial crisis.

Chambers therefore reportedly calls for a code of conduct to be established to ensure that US spooks don't advance the national interest by harming its economic interests.

The CEO has the high moral ground here. He must also, one imagines, find the latest chapter in the Snowden saga personally galling given Cisco's ongoing financial torpor. It's hard enough selling networking kit against aggressive competitors and the generational threat of software-defined-networking. Being singled out as the NSA's weapon of choice or offshore surveillance therefore won't be at all welcome, never mind helpful. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Hackers pop Brazil newspaper to root home routers
Step One: try default passwords. Step Two: Repeat Step One until success
UK.gov lobs another fistful of change at SME infosec nightmares
Senior Lib Dem in 'trying to be relevant' shocker. It's only taxpayers' money, after all
Critical Adobe Reader and Acrobat patches FINALLY make it out
Eight vulns healed, including XSS and DoS paths
Spies would need SUPER POWERS to tap undersea cables
Why mess with armoured 10kV cables when land-based, and legal, snoop tools are easier?
TOR users become FBI's No.1 hacking target after legal power grab
Be afeared, me hearties, these scoundrels be spying our signals
Blood-crazed Microsoft axes Trustworthy Computing Group
Security be not a dirty word, me Satya. But crevice, bigod...
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Freenode IRC users told to change passwords after securo-breach
Miscreants probably got in, you guys know the drill by now
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.