Feeds

Cisco's Chambers to Obama: Stop fiddling with our routers

It's not like the Borg need another thing to slow sales

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Cisco chief executive John Chambers has reportedly written to US President Obama, pointing out that the NSA tampering with kit it exports is not likely to result in more customer confidence or higher sales.

The allegation that the NSA intercepts and fiddles with Cisco kit before it can reach offshore customers was raised last week by Edward Snowden's amanuensis Glen Greenwald as he set out to spruik a new tome. Photos of Cisco kit on a workbench somewhere later emerged, giving credence to the story.

Cisco seems to be taking the story seriously enough that, according to the Financial Times (regwalled) Chambers has picked up a fresh sheet of letterhead and despatched it to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue with an angry message to the effect that, to quote the pink pages, “if these allegations are true, these actions will undermine confidence in our industry and in the ability of technology companies to deliver products globally.”

Which doesn't sound like a good way to help US outfits score the exports sales so desirable as it climbs slowly out of the ruins of the global financial crisis.

Chambers therefore reportedly calls for a code of conduct to be established to ensure that US spooks don't advance the national interest by harming its economic interests.

The CEO has the high moral ground here. He must also, one imagines, find the latest chapter in the Snowden saga personally galling given Cisco's ongoing financial torpor. It's hard enough selling networking kit against aggressive competitors and the generational threat of software-defined-networking. Being singled out as the NSA's weapon of choice or offshore surveillance therefore won't be at all welcome, never mind helpful. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.