Feeds

Intel shows off tech bubbles, low-power yacht racing and... a DIRECT solar charger

Chipzilla showcase mixes ideas with reality

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Pics In London this week, Intel’s Innovation Future Showcase not only presented a glimpse of how the chip giant reckons we’ll be interacting with the world in years to come, but, more soberly, allowed visitors to toy with some forthcoming products and current offerings.

Intel Galileo Bubbleao demo

Fit to burst: Galileo Bubbleao, just add modem and Tweet

And toy with them you must. After all, where would we be without an Intel Galileo developer board complete with modem hooked up to a bubble-making machine that fires out those spheres of nothingness when it receives the Twitter hashtag: #bubbleao? (It's a Bohemian Rhapsody pun... don't make us spell it out...)

Put that hashtag in your tweet and you’ll probably fire up the demo when Johnny Foreigner gets a look-in, as Intel is on the road in Europe this month.

Arguably, a visible reaction is going to be the most obvious way to demonstrate tech responding to commands. With the Internet of Things in mind, another working demo featured a Galileo board changing colours on a light strip controlled by an app on a mobile device.

Light fantastic – remote control from mobile network

Light fantastic – remote control from mobile network

To complicate matters slightly, a tablet was hooked up to a mobile phone acting as a hotspot that that then communicated the app instructions to the Galileo board which was connected via Ethernet to a router.

Needless to say, commands for home automation from a remote location are among the possible scenarios Intel suggests for this sort of idea. No doubt Raspberry Pi owners have been there and done that with these tricks and, admittedly, some of what was on display has been seen before at CES. However, products such as the diminutive Edison system-on-a-chip – that’s not much bigger than an SD card and due this summer – are getting close to release now.

Intel's trio: NUC, Galileo and Edison

Intel's trio: NUC, Galileo and Edison

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Apple takes blade to 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display
Shaves price, not screen on mid-2014 model
iPhone 6 flip tip slips in Aussie's clip: Apple's 'reversible USB' leaks
New plug not compatible with official Type-C, according to fresh rumors
The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?
And yes it does need a fat HDD (or SSD, it's cool with either)
FEAST YOUR EYES: Samsung's Galaxy Alpha has an 'entirely new appearance'
Wow, it looks like nothing else on the market, for sure
YES YES YES! Apple patents mousy, pressure-sensing iVibrator
Fanbois prepare to experience the great Cupertin-O
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
TV transport tech, part 1: From server to sofa at the touch of a button
You won't believe how much goes into today's telly tech
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.