Feeds

Honey, the satnav app says you're to leave at 6am... Yup. I'll have that coffee off you

CoPilot's CommuteMe now tells you when as well as where

The essential guide to IT transformation

For all the cleverness of location-based services, which will tell you the best places to eat and sleep when you arrive somewhere strange, most people just do the same job and complete the same journey every day.

The bread-and-butter for navigation app maker CoPilot GPS is providing routes to people who go to a lot of different places all the time – particularly fleets of drivers.

The biz's new CommuteMe software, however, is targeted at the regular commute. You tell it where you live and where you work, and it calculates not only how long it will take you but, allowing for traffic, when you should leave.

This isn’t particularly new – Nokia‘s HERE has done that for a while. What makes CommuteMe different is that the route it suggests isn’t set in stone. If you start using a different route to work, the software will realise; it won’t just say “make a U-turn when convenient”, it will start to learn your preferred route and use this as the basis for your ETA.

Unlike the Nokia software you don’t have to start the commute route. It will assume, as a creature of habit, that you are going to or from work from your start point and kick in automatically.

Doesn't insist you take the proscribed route.

"CoPilot v9.6 introduces unique adaptive learning technology and smarter route searching to make your daily drive more predictable and less stressful," said David Quin, vice president of consumer at ALK Technologies.

The satnav market is fantastically competitive, with Microsoft, Nokia, Google and Apple all having services which they give away – so you’d have thought it tough to compete. CoPilot does this by tailoring its software to specific customers, but there is significant development for the consumer product too, which is sold on a “freemium” model.

A lot of what the professional version does is optimise routes for customers, and that has been done with the points of interest. The new version has drag-and-drop for points of interest and is smart enough to only include those that are in the direction you are travelling. Something the other side of a motorway might be both yards and miles away at the same time, for example.

The new version is a free upgrade for existing users on iOS, Android and Windows Phone 8. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?