Feeds

Salesforce.com connects Heroku and Force.com

One for workers and one for punters makes double the fun for devs

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Salesforce.com's decision to acquire Heroku has looked an oddity for a while: why does a SaaS juggernaut with its own perfectly good Force.com development platform need a PaaS play like Heroku?

The eternally-enthusiastic company has just spelled out why, and how, it thinks the two will work together. The scheme is simple: developers building apps for employees will do it on Force.com and developers building apps for punters to consume will do it on Heroku.

A new bit called Heroku Connect links the two. The idea seems to be that Heroku can take care of all the heavy lifting required to deliver a web app at scale. Force.com retains its role as the place to do custom app development for your team and the new connector pipes data between the two with sufficient speed that no-one gets grumpy.

In the background things aren't so simple. Salesforce lives on Oracle software. Heroku relies on its own version of Postgres. So they offer rather different environments for developers. Salesforce is also being a bit cagey on data centre arrangements: let's hope they've got Force.com and Heroku as physically close as possible – so latency doesn't rear its ugly head during data transfers.

Salesforce is talking up the formal release of Heroku Connector as enhancing its overall proposition by making it possible to feed customer-generated data into apps that run business processes. Pulling off that trick, it says, has not been easy unless you code your entire business by hand, either as a startup or a business colossus with more developers than sense.

There's some truth in that idea. It's probably also not far from the mark to suggest that what Salesforce has really done here is build middleware-as-a-service to link the two divergent parts of its platform. In a weird way that's a sign of maturity: most big IT rigs have middleware kludges in them somewhere.

Salesforce will, no doubt, prattle on about disruptive cloudiness, but under the skin it will be using some old-school methods to keep things going. ®

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
FLAPE – the next BIG THING in storage
Find cold data with flash, transmit it from tape
Seagate chances ARM with NAS boxes for the SOHO crowd
There's an Atom-powered offering, too
Intel teaches Oracle how to become the latest and greatest Xeon Whisperer
E7-8895 v2 chips are best of the bunch, and with firmware-unlocked speed control
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.