Feeds

What's Android Silver? Samsung preps Tizen mobes 'for Russia, India'

No need to rely on Google's OS for Eurasian launch, reports suggest

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Samsung will reportedly launch a Tizen-powered smartphone in Russia and India.

The Wall Street Journal has chatted to its usual “people familiar with the matter” and reports that an all-singing, all-dancing launch event can be expected in early June in the two target nations. Lots of noise can also be expected at the Tizen Developer Conference in San Francisco, which kicks off on 2 June and runs until the 4th.

If Samsung does indeed release a smartphone running Tizen it would be another sign that the company is not entirely happy in its relationship with Google and the amount of cash it can make from Android-powered handsets. As the world's number one mobe-maker, Samsung is certainly shifting hardware by the container-load. But as Apple, Amazon and Google have shown, sales of apps and content can deliver cash for years after a device is first sold.

At present, Samsung's own apps and services are largely shunned by the hordes who buy its hardware. With the company's profits recently stalling, steering users to Samsung's own online services by using an operating system it can control – and on which Google services presumably won't be pre-installed – probably looks a tantalising prospect.

The Journal says the Tizen mobe launch event will be on a "global" scale, and as Vulture South has experienced that can mean lighting up the Sydney Opera house. Samsung probably wouldn't bother to launch a cheap handset with that kind of bash and there's no hint about the price of the of Tizen handset in either nation. Yet even if it is expensive, Apple may just have demonstrated that just a handful of millions of high-end-smartmobe buyers can spark a viable content revenue stream. Samsung could therefore price its Tizen mobe quite high, scoop up some deep-pocketed users, and do rather better with them than it could do with its various Galaxies.

If the release signals a more concerted attempt to turn its hardware into long-term cash cows, consider that the Journal says Samsung also plans a Tizen-powered television. Televisions' role as content-and-revenue funnels is, as yet, not as important as that offered by mobile devices. But with Google, Apple and Amazon all sniffing around the lounge, perhaps Samsung is considering the prospect of a harmonised OS ecosystem on your couch as another route to years of movie-download dollars. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Internet Security Threat Report 2014
An overview and analysis of the year in global threat activity: identify, analyze, and provide commentary on emerging trends in the dynamic threat landscape.