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Webcast: How to build an open cloud

Saying no to silos

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5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

It's a hybrid world. But proprietary clouds are hard to integrate and less flexible. On the other hand, you're already using them.

To coordinate your internal and external clouds, migration, administration, data protection, compliance, service levels and support need to be coordinated too.

The answer might lie in the open cloud. But what does that mean in reality?

Join us in the studio on 27 May to hear HP's Peter Mansell, who will explain why HP decided to build CloudSystem around open standards and APIs, and Freeform Dynamics' Dale Vile, who will explain how you can avoid building yourself into a silo.

So if you're wondering what the fuss is about OpenStack, how to solve the management problem, how to integrate AWS into your architecture, or just how to grow cloud capacity in a way you won't regret, sign up for this free Regcast.

The Reg's Tim Phillips will be keeping order as usual, and putting your questions to the experts. Sign yourself up right here.

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

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