Feeds

Brit chap weaves silver bullet for wireless health scare bollocks

Shortwave-shorting shorts use silver to protect wedding tackle from radio-infested planet

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Move over, brain-cancer scare-mongers: a Brit physics graduate has taken the kind of material used to create anti-stink exercise gear, run it up as underwear, and is trying to flog it as a Faraday cage for mens' wedding tackle.

By including four times as much silver in its product than the typical five per cent weave used for anti-microbial deodorant garments as are loved by cyclists and gym-junkies, Wireless Armour says its underwear, a snip starting at £24 per pair, will block all electromagnetic radiation from 30 MHz to 18 GHz.

The Indiegogo offering, here, says the Wireless Armour underwear is “designed to protect the health of a wireless generation glued to their mobile devices. We are exposing ourselves to unprecedented levels of Electromagnetic radiation and this is showing with our declining sperm counts and increasing cases of cancer.”

Over on its own page, Wireless Armour has gems like this, discussing the 450 MHz band: “This frequency is part of the controversial TETRA frequencies. It is used for Government and Police communications. There is a lot of support against this new communications system, citing many health concerns”.

The outfit also states that TETRA is one of the two most important bands to block (along with with GSM bands), along with the various WiFi bands. The company's understanding of frequency allocations can be examined by all and sundry here.

Wireless Armour Shorts

Worried about your cojones? There's a silver lining

While 450 MHz is stipulated for TETRA, the band has been in use for decades: TETRA merely uses the old carriers for digital instead of analogue signals. That hasn't stopped wireless kooks from treating it as something new and dangerous, as Wireless Armour cites.

Unless you habitually hang a walkie-talkie of some kind from your belt, however, you're not likely to encounter any 450 Mhz sources you hold against your body.

There's also reference to this study which showed a very nearby WiFi source, continually operating for four hours, will kill sperm that's outside the body. As The Register reported at the time, the study has limited real significance.

As Dr Allan Percy of the University of Sheffield noted then: “Ejaculated sperm are particularly sensitive to many factors because outside the body they don't have the protection of the other cells, tissues and fluids of the body in which they are stored before ejaculation.”

While there's no reason to doubt that the fabric can probably block radio frequencies, El Reg would quibble at the persistent references to a “faraday cage”, since the latter is an enclosure and mens' underwear isn't. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
GRAV WAVE DRAMA: 'Big Bang echo' may have been grit on the scanner – boffins
Exit Planet Dust on faster-than-light expansion of universe
Mine Bitcoins with PENCIL and PAPER
Forget Sudoku, crunch SHA-256 algos
SpaceX Dragon cargo truck flies 3D printer to ISS: Clawdown in 3, 2...
Craft berths at space station with supplies, experiments, toys
NASA rover Curiosity drills HOLE in MARS 'GOLF COURSE'
Joins 'traffic light' and perfect stony sphere on the Red Planet
'This BITE MARK is a SMOKING GUN': Boffins probe ancient assault
Tooth embedded in thigh bone may tell who pulled the trigger
Big dinosaur wowed females with its ENORMOUS HOOTER
That's right, Doris, I've got biggest snout in the prehistoric world
DOLPHINS SMELL MAGNETS – did we hear that right, boffins?
Xavier's School for Gifted Magnetotaceans
Japanese volcano eruption reportedly leaves 31 people presumed dead
Hopes fade of finding survivors on Mount Ontake
That glass of water you just drank? It was OLDER than the SUN
One MEELLION years older. Some of it anyway
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.