Feeds

Securo-borg FireEye coughs $70m to buy 'flight-recorder-for-networks' tech

First Mandiant, now nPulse - whatever will it swallow next?

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Security vendor FireEye has bought network forensics firm nPulse Technologies in a $70m deal.

FireEye is stumping up $60m in cash and $10m in stock to get its hands on nPulse, a privately held startup that boasts it offers the industry's fastest full packet capture and indexing technology.

nPulse’s forensics will be integrated into FireEye's Network Threat Prevention Platform and bundled with recently introduced IPS capabilities to create a more capable threat management platform.

nPulse's technology (which is rated up to 10Gbps full duplex, or fast enough for any high-speed corporate LAN) will make it easier for corporations to detect and respond to security breaches at an earlier stage that might otherwise be the case, thereby reducing the resulting harm.

“The new reality of security is that every organisation has some piece of malicious code within their network,” said David DeWalt, chairman of the board and chief executive officer of FireEye, in a canned statement.

“The more important question is has that code been able to execute any compromising activity that puts the organisation at risk, and if so, what data left the network? With the addition of the nPulse solution, the FireEye platform will have a “flight recorder” for security analytics. By incorporating real-time breach information from the endpoint and the network, we’re building a single platform to provide the most in-depth attack information and the right data to protect and remediate before a compromise turns catastrophic,” added DeWalt.

The nPulse buyout deal will allow FireEye to compete with the likes of HP (ArcSight) and IBM (QRadar) in the Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) sub-segment of the security business, as well as going head-to-head with startups such as LogLogic.

The tech will be offered alongside services from cyber intelligence outfit Mandiant, which FireEye acquired for $1bn last December.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
Why did it take antivirus giants YEARS to drill into super-scary Regin? Symantec responds...
FYI this isn't just going to target Windows, Linux and OS X fans
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Home Office: Fancy flogging us some SECRET SPY GEAR?
If you do, tell NOBODY what it's for or how it works
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described
'A degree of technical competence rarely seen'
Syrian Electronic Army in news site 'hack' POP-UP MAYHEM
Gigya redirect exploit blamed for pop-rageous ploy
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.