Feeds

Snapchat updates fap-snap sharing app ... now with more Chat

Add live chat and video calling to your secret somewhat private convos

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Self-destructing photo sharing service Snapchat has added real-time messaging and video chat to the latest versions of its mobile apps, in a move seemingly designed to make it more competitive with the likes of BBM and WhatsApp.

Snapchat began life as a way for smartphone users to send each other saucy selfies that automatically delete themselves a few seconds after they're viewed.

The company is so proud of this innovation that its 23-year-old CEO, Evan Spiegel, has reportedly turned down acquisition offers worth as much as $4bn, despite having yet to come up with a revenue model for the service.

Following revelations that Snapchat is neither as private nor secure as its users might hope for, however, the company is now branching out.

"Until today, we felt that Snapchat was missing an important part of conversation: presence," a Snapchat spokesperson said in a blog post on Thursday. "There's nothing like knowing you have the full attention of your friend while you're chatting."

To that end, Snapchat has added a new feature called – aptly enough – Chat. You can now swipe your friends' names in your Snapchat inbox to open a Chat window where you can message each other in real time.

You can also press and hold a friend's name to open a two-way video chat session. When you lift your finger, the session ends.

Youtube Video

True to form, Snapchat is touting the ephemeral nature of such chats, although it's being surprisingly nonchalant about how private the messages might really be.

"When you leave the chat screen, messages viewed by both you and your friend will be cleared," the company's blog post states, "but either of you can always tap or screenshot to save anything you'd like to keep (addresses, to-do lists, etc.)!"

It seems Snapchat – which never guaranteed that you could be sure your naughty pics were actually deleted – now operates on a policy of "deletion by default – you keep what you want, and we'll get rid of everything else!"

That messaging shift doesn't seem to have deterred Snapchat's fans, though. On Thursday, the blog post was accompanied by messages from dozens of would-be users complaining either that Snapchat's in-app upgrade feature didn't work or that the new version wasn't yet available in their app store. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
China: You, Microsoft. Office-Windows 'compatibility'. You have 20 days to explain
Told to cough up more details as antitrust probe goes deeper
Windows 7 settles as Windows XP use finally starts to slip … a bit
And at the back of the field, Windows 8.1 is sprinting away from Windows 8
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?