Feeds

Japan, Europe to shake hands on China-deterring tech deals

First item of business: underwater drones

Security for virtualized datacentres

Japan looks set to sign a number of agreements with Western allies in the coming weeks, in what appears to be a series of moves designed to keep China in check militarily and in cyber space.

A Tokyo official said on Tuesday that PM Shinzo Abe is planning to finalise a deal with French president Francois Hollande next week which will see the two countries co-operate on building unmanned surveillance submersibles, according to Kyodo.

The two nations have already agreed to team up on developing defence technologies, but Japan is apparently looking to manoeuvre the deal so that France can’t sell on any of that equipment to a third party.

China has apparently been sniffing around after Xi Jinping met Hollande in Paris last month.

Tokyo has set aside ¥500 million (£2.9m) for the current fiscal year to develop the underwater drones, the report claimed.

On the same tour to Europe – which will take in Germany, the UK, Spain, Portugal and France – Abe is also planning to meet EU leaders in Brussels in a bid to ramp up co-operation on cyber security related matters.

A draft statement to be issued after the meeting and seen by Kyodo also points to an inaugural Japan-EU Space Policy Dialogue meeting in Tokyo in the second half of the year.

A brief exert had the following:

Facing more severe, widespread and globalised risks surrounding cyberspace...protection of a safe, open and secure cyberspace is needed...We affirm the importance of safety, security and sustainability of outer space activities.

Hawkish Abe has made no secret of his desire to engage more proactively with the international community on cyber security and military matters, in a bid to counter the growing dominance of China in Asia and on the world stage.

His government has already mooted plans to create a DARPA-style agency to research, develop and adapt cutting edge technologies for possible military use.

It’s also making long overdue improvements to government cyber defences and has made information security a cornerstone of its National Security Strategy, adopted last December. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.