Feeds

Nod Labs forges one (Bluetooth) ring to rule them all

Point and click fingering is the future, claims team

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

A team of engineers formerly from Google and Jawbone thinks it has cracked gesture recognition for electronics with a Bluetooth-equipped ring that can control cursor movements and manipulate household devices.

Nod Labs Bluetooth ring

The Nod sans cover

The Nod is a somewhat bulky black ring of surgical steel with a touchpad and two buttons built into the base. It houses a nine-axis accelerometer and two Cortex M3 processors to provide the grunt. The manufacturers claim the device's Bluetooth will give it a range of 30 feet and its open development platform is compatible with Windows, OS X, iOS, Android 4.4, and Linux.

When wearing the ring, a hand gesture will move a cursor in a computer, TV, or smartphone screen. The touchpad on the base of the ring gives additional control and buttons on the base allow for clicking keys or programmable actions, and hand movements like twisting can be used to control onscreen dials or devices like the Nest smart thermostat.

Youtube Video

Nod is also touting the ring as a security device, enabling an extra level of authentication on smartphones and computers when it is close enough to be registered. That does leave you with a rather large problem if you lose the thing, however.

The ring comes in four sizes, with inserts so that a variety of different finger sizes can be accommodated. The battery is good for a day of use before it has to go back into its charging station. Preorders on the device start on Tuesday and the firm is selling each unit for $149.

Whether or not it will get any takers is another matter. Gesture control has been around for a while now and there's little evidence that it's a killer app.

Sure, Microsoft bundles it in with the Kinect and Intel is making some moves in the area. But gesture controllers like Leap Motion have hardly set the world on fire, and Nod's ring may be consigned to the long list of "pretty but useless" gizmos that litter the tech industry. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Raspberry Pi B+: PHWOAR, get a load of those pins
More USB ports than your laptop? You'd better believe it...
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
Super Cali signs a kill-switch, campaigners say it's atrocious
Remote-death button bad news for crooks, protesters – and great news for hackers?
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.