Feeds

IBM throws open doors of XaaS supermarket

'Cloud marketplace' aims to outflank mere cloud convenience from AWS et al

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

IBM has thrown open the doors of its “cloud marketplace” a software-and-infrastructure-and-platform-as-a-service supermarket that offers its own and third party products.

The marketplace has three main elements.

The foundation is the familiar SoftLayer infrastructure-as-a-service service, which like rivals from AWS, Google, Microsoft and Rackspace allows customers to spin up cloudy servers and then discard them whenever it suits.

A new piece of the Big Blue cloud is the Bluemix platform-as-a-service play. Bluemix is based on Pivotal's CloudFoundry and offers its rapid deployment of rigs that are ready to run apps, as distinct from the IaaS modus operandi of rolling one's own servers. Bluemix also offers lots of IBM middleware, plus new services tailored to those who wish to jump on the Big Data and/or Internet of Things bandwagons.

The marketplace itself is a SaaS shopfront blending IBM's own software and that of its partners.

Big Blue's hinted at most of this stuff for months, so the fact it has now hit the On switch is a milestone rather than a revelation. The launch does, however, put IBM in the cloud game like never before and does so in a powerful way: the likes of AWS have reached out to independent software developers to help them deliver cloudy subscription services, but IBM has been helping that crowd get to market for decades and probably represents a more comfortable on-ramp to the cloud.

Combining PaaS, IaaS and SaaS also gives IBM plenty of breadth and depth, again a useful distinction.

Another thing in IBM's favour is its deep roots in enterprise IT departments. Cloudy contenders have clearly done well with startups, those that need to operate at web scale and pockets within IT departments. IBM can now satisfy those users' needs but also conduct conversations that go well beyond infrastructure simplification and cost-cutting.

IBM has to be in this game: it is stunningly clear that IT departments are evaporating their on-premises software and kit at a rapid rate.

Yet IBMers of your correspondent's acquaintance despair about Big Blue's marketing and its ability, or lack thereof, to bring in new buyers. The workers central complaint is just how endless ads about smarter planets translate into demand from enterprise buyers. It will be interesting to see how much marketing muscle IBM swings behind its new cloudy capers and how it positions them against rivals.

IBM sent The Reg an infographic about the launch, which perhaps shows it is getting hip with the cool-and-cloudy kids. Will that be enough to help it catch its rivals? ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.