Feeds

KILLER ROBOTS, DNA TAMPERING and PEEPING CYBORGS: the future looks bright!

Americans optimistic about technology despite being afraid of EVERYTHING

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Coming advances in technology have a majority of Americans optimistic about the future, yet nervous about looming technologies, a survey has found.

According to a Pew Research study, 59 per cent of those polled believe that technological change will make people's lives in the future "mostly better" compared to just 30 per cent who predict the future will be "mostly worse."

The study noted that men have a more favorable outlook on the future, where 67 per cent believe it will be mostly better, compared to 51 per cent of women. Men and women who possess university degrees were also particularly optimistic about our technological future, with 66 per cent believing the future will be mostly better.

Despite the favorable overall outlook, however, Americans are leery of specific emerging technologies. The study found that 66 per cent were not in favor of parents altering the DNA of their children to improve physical and mental traits, and 65 per cent were against the idea of lifelike robots serving as caregivers to the sick and elderly.

A further 53 per cent think that a rise in brain implant devices would be for the worse, and just 26 per cent would want to implant a device in their brain to enhance memory and mental performance. 63 per cent would consider the use of drone aircraft over US skies a change for the worse.

Just 48 per cent of Americans favor self-driving cars, though the study found that personal flying craft and other transportation advances were among the most eagerly-anticipated technology advances.

Similarly, 80 per cent of Americans are looking forward to the development of synthetic organs for transplant patients in the next 50 years, but just 20 per cent of those polled would be interested in eating lab-grown meat.

Among the areas where the study found the public to be most skeptical were the ability of science to influence the weather, as just 19 per cent believe weather control will become a reality in the next 50 years.

More likely, according to the American public, is the advent of long term space colonies (33 per cent believe this will happen), teleportation devices (39 per cent), and machines that can create art at the same skill level as humans (51 per cent). ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Gigantic toothless 'DRAGONS' dominated Earth's early skies
Gummy pterosaurs outlived toothy competitors
Vulture 2 takes a battering in 100km/h test run
Still in one piece, but we're going to need MORE POWER
TRIANGULAR orbits will help Rosetta to get up close with Comet 67P
Probe will be just 10km from Space Duck in October
Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away
Bizarre-looking creature actually related to velvet worms
CRR-CRRRK, beep, beep: Mars space truck backs out of slippery sand trap
Curiosity finds new drilling target after course correction
'Leccy racer whacks petrols in Oz race
ELMOFO rakes in two wins in sanctioned race
What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this
Sorry, Harvard, did you say kilobots or KILLER BOTS?
NASA's rock'n'roll shock: ROLLING STONE FOUND ON MARS
No sign of Ziggy Stardust and his band
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.