Feeds

NBN Co in 'broadband kit we tested worked' STUNNER

Announcement of VDSL trial is not proof of concept for fibre-to-the-node

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

NBN Co, the entity charged with building and operating Australia's National Broadband Network (NBN), has let world+dog know that one test of VDSL delivered over fibre-to-the-node (FTTN) worked.

You can read the announcement here if you want: it explains that the test achieved “delivered raw download speeds of 105 megabits per second (Mbps) and upload speeds of 45 Mbps.” We suggest you also read between the lines because the announcement is scandalously scanty because it omits discussion of topics including:

  • Whether the test in any way resembled a real-world scenario
  • Whether the test used a production network connection or something set up especially for the occasion
  • Whether the test used the equipment NBN Co intends to use in production
  • The state of the twisted pair between the node and the retail store where the test was conducted
  • Length of the cable run, not just the linear distance between the node and store
  • Setting used on the node and modem during the test
  • What kind of data was downloaded

We could go on but by now you probably get the point: a press release saying “we've proved FTTN probably works” and offering very few other details is an interesting way to prove the government's new mixed media NBN is going to deliver the goods. Or even prove it can deliver the bits.

Sadly, the news of this “result” will probably go down very well in the places where it counts … for the government. Mainstream non-technology media, many of whom are more sympathetic to the government’s ideology than the opposition's, are likely to uncritically report the “success” of the test. In the public imagination this event could therefore be considered an important milestone.

For this correspondent, the “test” is nothing more than a note reporting that a test of a VDSL product worked. Without full information about the circumstances of the test, it is impossible to ascribe any greater significance to it. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
UK.gov's Open Source switch WON'T get rid of Microsoft, y'know
What do you mean, we've ditched Redmond in favour of IBM?!
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.