Feeds

Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches

German service pays tribute to Lavabit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Lavaboom, a German-based and supposedly NSA-proof email service, will go into private beta this week. Its mission is to spread the Edward Snowden gospel by making encrypted email accessible to all.

Although it has been referred to in various parts of the interwebs as an heir to Lavabit, the now-defunct encrypted email service used by Snowden, the new service's name is a tribute to its predecessor and nothing more.

Lavaboom is a free service with a 500MB mailbox limit made secure by three main principles: end-to-end encryption; “zero-knowledge privacy”; and “three-way authentication”.

The firm said its aim is to make encryption as “simple as sending regular email” so anyone can use it.

Three-way authentication is offered for Lavaboom’s “more security conscious users” as follows:

In addition to your key-pair and password we can either send you a randomly generated code or you can use the OTP-feature of a YubiKey. Or even both. We strongly recommend using YubiKey.

The firm also recommended users submit their public keys to a key server, adding the following by way of explanation:

We only use trusted, Open-Source key-servers such as the SKS-Pool and the MIT-Pool. These services are used for public key submission as well as public-key retrieval. You can add your key to a key-server or exchange public key hashes and then manually import them into Lavaboom.

Although the service is free there are additional Premium and Plus plans for those who want additional storage space.

Lavaboom was founded by Felix Müller-Irion in Germany, so presumably it stands a reasonably good chance of staying as NSA proof as possible.

In the end, Lavabit founder Ladar Levison was forced to pull the plug on his service last year in a last ditch bid to stop the US authorities getting their hands on user emails.

Aside from fleeing "traitors" to the United States, Lavaboom may also be of interest to cryptocoin users, and Bitcoins will be accepted as a payment option.

For those who need more info there’s a detailed FAQ here and a brief Reddit conversation with Müller-Irion and CMO Bill Franklin here. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Ice cream headache as black hat hacks sack Dairy Queen
I scream, you scream, we all scream 'DATA BREACH'!
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
Three quarters of South Korea popped in online gaming raids
Records used to plunder game items, sold off to low lifes
Oz fed police in PDF redaction SNAFU
Give us your metadata, we'll publish your data
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?