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VMware fires up vCloud Disaster Recovery service

Anti-Godzilla tech saves precious bit barn data from unforeseen stomping

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The main thing VMware has that its cloud rivals lack is a widely deployed, fundamental bit of data-center technology – its ESX hypervisor – and the virtualization company is beginning to play on this advantage with new products.

The first of an expected salvo of services that use its ESX hypervisor came on Tuesday when the company announced disaster-recovery tech for its vCloud Hybrid Service cloud.

This means VMware customers can access a recovery service hosted in VMware's data centers in the US and UK that protects them from on-premise equipment failures.

The snappily abbreviated vCHSDR ["Ver-chus-druh," phonetically—Ed.] costs from $835 per month for a terabyte of storage plus some standby cloud server(s) with 20GB of RAM.

The tech "is a replication and hosting service ideal for businesses with limited or no DR solution in place today, or customers looking to replace a traditional offering with a service provider or one that is managed in-house. VMware vCloud Hybrid Service–Disaster Recovery provides simple and secure asynchronous replication and failover for vSphere virtual environments," VMware wrote in a press release announcing the tech.

Like other clouds, VMware recommends that people ship it hard drives for the intilial data population and then replicate information into the service after that.

VMware has released this service due to surprisingly high demand from VMware customers, said the company's veep of cloud services Matthew Lodge in a chat with El Reg. "We upped the priority of the DR service. We moved it up based on customer feedback," he said.

vCHSDR will compete with a number of specific technologies along with other clouds, such as Microsoft's Azure tech which has a variety of disaster recovery options, and Amazon Web Services which operates a Storage Gateway service for data replication and recovery into and from its cloud. Google, meanwhile, has yet to develop a DR service for its cloud. ®

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