Feeds

VMware fires up vCloud Disaster Recovery service

Anti-Godzilla tech saves precious bit barn data from unforeseen stomping

The essential guide to IT transformation

The main thing VMware has that its cloud rivals lack is a widely deployed, fundamental bit of data-center technology – its ESX hypervisor – and the virtualization company is beginning to play on this advantage with new products.

The first of an expected salvo of services that use its ESX hypervisor came on Tuesday when the company announced disaster-recovery tech for its vCloud Hybrid Service cloud.

This means VMware customers can access a recovery service hosted in VMware's data centers in the US and UK that protects them from on-premise equipment failures.

The snappily abbreviated vCHSDR ["Ver-chus-druh," phonetically—Ed.] costs from $835 per month for a terabyte of storage plus some standby cloud server(s) with 20GB of RAM.

The tech "is a replication and hosting service ideal for businesses with limited or no DR solution in place today, or customers looking to replace a traditional offering with a service provider or one that is managed in-house. VMware vCloud Hybrid Service–Disaster Recovery provides simple and secure asynchronous replication and failover for vSphere virtual environments," VMware wrote in a press release announcing the tech.

Like other clouds, VMware recommends that people ship it hard drives for the intilial data population and then replicate information into the service after that.

VMware has released this service due to surprisingly high demand from VMware customers, said the company's veep of cloud services Matthew Lodge in a chat with El Reg. "We upped the priority of the DR service. We moved it up based on customer feedback," he said.

vCHSDR will compete with a number of specific technologies along with other clouds, such as Microsoft's Azure tech which has a variety of disaster recovery options, and Amazon Web Services which operates a Storage Gateway service for data replication and recovery into and from its cloud. Google, meanwhile, has yet to develop a DR service for its cloud. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything
Enter credit card details if you want that system you bought to actually be useful
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers
Think those are cool? Wait till you get a load of our racks
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
VMware's high-wire balancing act: EVO might drag us ALL down
Get it right, EMC, or there'll be STORAGE CIVIL WAR. Mark my words
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.