Feeds

Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders

Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial

Boost IT visibility and business value

Samsung brought in heavyweight champion Google to fight in its corner in its latest patent bout with Apple in the US on Friday.

In the latest instalment of the ongoing patent wars, current veep of engineering for Android, Hiroshi Lockheimer, testified that Android was all Google's idea.

Much as Apple engineers did in their testimony earlier in the week, Lockheimer described how hard a small bunch of engineers and devs worked to build Android, outlining a "gruelling" schedule of 60- to 80-hour working weeks.

"We'd work really late at work ... all hours," he said, according to The Verge.

He said the team had grown from fewer than 30 employees to the 600 to 700 workers it has today. Lockheimer denied that Google had copied anything from the iPhone for the operating system.

"We like to have our own identity. We like to have our own ideas," the Wall Street Journal reported him as saying.

He also testified that Samsung didn't partner with Google on Android, saying there were times when Sammy asked for changes and Mountain View refused to implement them.

Samsung is trying to defend against the software patent infringement case by saying that the technology in question comes from Google and Google developed it all by itself. Apple says it's not suing Google and it was Samsung that chose to copy the iPhone with its popular Galaxy line of devices.

The fruity firm is looking for a huge amount of money in damages, up to $2.2bn, a number that Samsung lawyers have called a "gross, gross exaggeration".

Apple wrapped up its arguments on Friday with its damages expert Christopher Vellturo. The economist said that by his analysis, the alleged infringement of the five patents in the case had cost Apple $1.07bn in lost profits and it deserved the other $1.12bn as a "reasonable royalty". ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Time to move away from Windows 7 ... whoa, whoa, who said anything about Windows 8?
Start migrating now to avoid another XPocalypse – Gartner
You'll find Yoda at the back of every IT conference
The piss always taking is he. Bastard the.
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.