Feeds

Sony battery recall as VAIO goes out with a bang, not a whimper

The perils of having Panasonic as a partner

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

If you're one of the few people who bought a Sony VAIO Fit 11A laptop/tablet convertible unit in the last few months, you need to unplug it immediately and step away from the system, Sony has warned.

"It has come to our attention that some of the internal, non-removable battery packs provided to us by a third party supplier and included in VAIO Fit 11A released in February 2014 have the potential to overheat resulting in partial burns to the housing of the PC," said the troubled Japanese zaibatsu in a recall notice.

The laptops went on sale in February and are the last to bear Sony's VAIO brand. The company said three cases of overheating had been reported so far and, in all, over 25,000 systems will have to be returned for replacement or repair.

Sony said that around half of the afflicted laptops, which the company ceased selling at the start of the month, were sold in the Far East, with another 7,000 being shipped to European markets. Sony sold just 500 units to the US market, but users are advised to check the serial numbers of their system just to be on the safe side.

Panasonic confirmed to The Wall Street Journal that it supplied the built-in batteries to Sony for this model as part of an outsourcing contract. None of the other companies it supplies with batteries have reported any similar problems, a spokeswoman said, noting that the Sony supplies were a custom job for this particular laptop.

It's not the first time VAIO's have had problems. Sony was forced to recall some systems in 2006 after the batteries it used – and that were supplied to many other manufacturers – proved to be faulty and prone to ignition. It also issued partial VAIO recalls in 2003, 2008, and 2009 for electrical and chip problems.

The VAIO, introduced in 1997, was Sony's premium laptop line and achieved a lot of success thanks to a mixture of raw grunt, tiny form factor, and stylish design. The laptops came at a significant price premium, which consumers were happy to pay for a while, but they fell out of favor as cheap and stylish systems from other manufacturers came online and netbooks cannibalized the small-computer market.

Last month Sony announced it was selling off its entire laptop line to Japan Industrial Partners (JIP), dropping manufacturing in favor of concentrating on the tablet and mobile phone markets. Ever since 2009 the company has been in financial trouble, and is slimming down its operations to profitable business units only. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.