Feeds

Google to open up Glass program to anyone with $1,500 to spare

Provided you live in the US, that is

Reducing security risks from open source software

Google has announced that anyone will soon be able to buy one of its Glass headsets for a limited time, provided they live in the US and have $1,500 (plus tax) to pay for them.

Up until now, access to the Glass Explorer program has been restricted. Around 2,000 units were sold to developers who paid up at Google's 2012 I/O developer conference, and since then Google has offered up to 8,000 more units to testers or competition winners, or for use in businesses to test their usefulness in specific industries.

"Our Explorers are moms, bakers, surgeons, rockers, and each new Explorer has brought a new perspective that is making Glass better," said the Glass team on its Google+ page. "But every day we get requests from those of you who haven’t found a way into the program yet, and we want your feedback too. So in typical Explorer Program fashion, we’re trying something new."

Punters of no particular qualification will be able to purchase a pair of the high-tech specs for the first time on April 15, and will get to choose between a variety of frame styles and colors. Prescription lenses can also be fitted to the headsets for those of us who need them.

Google hasn't said how many units it is opening up for sale at this point, but warns that supplies are limited. This might seem like a marketing gimmick, but Google has been keeping a tight grip on the Glass prototypes ahead of the expected commercial launch this summer, so supplies may be tight.

Google has been keen to point out that the current Glass hardware is still very much in a beta phase and the final commercial product could look very different from the current design. It has also signed up Luxottica, which owns the stylish Ray-Ban and Oakley specs sellers, to help make Glass a bit cooler.

But today's announcement, as well as a program announced on Tuesday to give additional support for businesses to develop for the platform, indicates that we probably won’t see too many changes before the final product hits the shelves. ®

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases
Uncle Larry's mutually-optimised stack to become clearer in August
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.