Feeds

Microsoft spells out new rules for exiling .EXEs

Adware classification regime won't tolerate privacy probes or auto-installs

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Microsoft has updated the methodology it uses to define adware, a move designed to make it clearer just what the company considers worthy for removal by its malware tools.

Redmond's new rules are simple: an application is adware if any of the following criteria are met:

  • It breaks the “unwanted behaviour” rules (in more detail below);
  • The advertising is inappropriate or out-of-context for the user; or
  • The adware doesn't respect user privacy.

Microsoft also notes that consumer complaints are taken into account in classifying adware.

A detailed description of the classification criteria is here.

The kinds of “unwanted behaviours” that Redmond is looking for will be familiar to anyone who's been burned by mistakenly clicking on the link, with lack of user choice or control topping the list. Programs that lie about their intent or try to hide themselves from the user's notice are verboten, as is software that installs itself, re-installs itself, sucks down other apps without telling the user – and, of course, software that falsely claims to be from Microsoft.

Microsoft will also be looking for software that opens browser windows without permission, redirects or blocks search queries, or manipulates Website content without permission. “Your computer is running slow” adware messages are also getting the hard eye from Microsoft's malware-machers.

The provider of the software has to be clearly identified, you have to be able to close advertising windows, and the software has to be uninstallable “using the same name as shown in the ads [the software] produces”, Microsoft states.

The full set of criteria is detailed here. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described
'A degree of technical competence rarely seen'
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.