Feeds

Samsung slurps up full charge in 30 seconds with bio-battery

Too bad it's the size of a brick

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Vid A two-year-old Israeli startup, StoreDot, thinks it has cracked the problems of limited battery life with a smartphone battery made of biological structures that can recharge in around 30 seconds.

StoreDot sprang from research into Alzheimer's at Tel Aviv University which identified naturally occurring crystals two nanometers in diameter that show interesting properties. The crystals, short chains of amino acids called peptides, can store a charge or emit light, are easy and cheap to make, and are non-toxic, the company claims.

The firm had been working on using the crystals, which it calls NanoDots, into displays and semiconductors. But at Microsoft's Think Next Conference in Tel Aviv on Monday, the team showed off a Samsung S4 with a prototype NanoDot battery attached that charges a nearly dead battery to full power in a little under 30 seconds.

Based on the video the firm has released, the technology certainly seems to work – but it's also clear that there's a long way to go. The battery on display is the size of a small brick, and there can't be that many mobile phone users who are looking for that retro early-1980s look in their next handset.

According to reports, the firm says the new technology will cost about double that of a standard battery pack, and the company is on track to make the device small enough to pack into a standard smartphone by 2016. Ship-date estimates being what they are in the real world, however, it could well take longer.

Based on the paucity of information about the technology, El Reg is adopting a skeptical tone so far, but it's clear others are convinced. Last year StoreDot got an infusion of $6m in VC funding to develop the technology, and one of the backers if rumored to be Samsung itself.

That would certainly make sense for the Korean chaebol to get involved. Battery life is now one of the chief things holding back smartphone development, and it's a constant whine from smartphone builders and developers that so much more could be done with the platform if power weren't so much of a problem. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.