Feeds

Right, Turkey – elections are over. You can use Twitter again

A little censorship goes a long way... for Turkish PM Tayyip Erdogan

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The Turkish government has finally lifted its ban on Twitter after a largely unsuccessful attempt at state-sponsored censorship in the run-up to key local elections held last Sunday.

Prime minister Tayyip Erdogan’s administration blocked the popular microblogging platform a fortnight ago after complaining of a smear campaign when alleged recordings of senior officials making shady deals appeared on the site.

The telecoms authority (TIB) confirmed to Reuters on Thursday that the ban had been lifted, a whole week after an Ankara court ruled in favour of a group of journos and lawyers who complained that the block contravened their "freedom of information and communication”.

The ban followed some fighting talk from the PM, who branded Twitter a “scourge” and said of social media “we will wipe out all of these”.

He followed the Twitter blockade last week with a ban on YouTube – on which site agitators had also posted audio files incriminating his administration.

In the end the Twitter ban didn’t appear to have much effect. Just a day after it came into force some social media agencies were measuring a spike in tweets of up to 130 per cent from Turkish users.

Many used TOR or VPNs to get around the ban, whilst Twitter also tweeted several numbers its followers could use to SMS their posts.

A lifting of the ban always seemed likely in light of this, and after president Abdullah Gul declared, on Twitter, that it was “unacceptable”.

For the record, Erdogan’s Justice and Development (AK) party took over 45 per cent of the vote at the elections. All El Reg can deduce from this is that either censorship works or there are a lot of Twitter haters in Turkey. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix
Everyone else in Europe compensates us - why can't you?
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
BT said to have pulled patent-infringing boxes from DSL network
Take your license demand and stick it in your ASSIA
Right to be forgotten should apply to Google.com too: EU
And hey - no need to tell the website you've de-listed. That'll make it easier ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.