Feeds

'iPhone 6' with '4.7-inch' display 'coming soon', but '5.5-incher' 'delayed'

Just transplant phone guts into a 27-inch iMac, remove its stand, and be done with it

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Apple's Asian suppliers will begin producing 4.7-inch displays as soon as next month for a next-gen iPhone release this fall, but 5.5-inch displays for an even bigger Cupertinian handset are said to be delayed due to production problems.

So reports Reuters, citing supply chain sources – which, as Ars Technica astutely points out, "could mean anything from a Foxconn vice president down to a factory janitor."

Reuters also says that their talkative sources say that Apple has chosen three different suppliers for the displays: Japan Display, Sharp, and LG Display, but which company is producing which display was not mentioned.

It should be noted that Japan Display – which Reuters sources say will begin production for Apple this May, the earliest of the three – announced last Thursday that it would begin shipping 5.5-inch, 2,560-by-1,440-pixel, 538-ppi screens this month.

That company did not reveal in its announcement, however, whether those high-res beauties would use a film-based multitouch sensor or the more technically challenging – but thinner – in-cell touch sensor tech used in in the iPhone 5, 5s, and 5c's 4-inch, 1,136-by-640-pixel, 326-ppi displays.

Japan Display's 5.5-inch, 2,560-by-1,440-pixel, 538-ppi display

Japan Display's 5.5-inch ... uh ... display
(click to enlarge)

In point of fact, one of Reuters' sources said that the reason that production of the 5.5-inch display would begin after that of the 4.7-inch display was the difficulty of producing in-cell tech at the larger size, and that when production of the 5.5-inch display begins "several months later," it may indeed be built using film-sensor technology.

Although a 4.7-inch display is a notable step up from the 4-inch display in the iPhone 5, 5s, and 5c, Samsung's flagship Galaxy S5 has a 5.1-inch, 1,920-by-1,080, 432-ppi display that the übergeeks at DisplayMate called "the best performing smartphone display that we have ever tested" that has "raised the bar for top display performance up by another notch."

Apple has been roundly spanked for sticking to smaller displays in its iPhones. Although some users – one of whom, full disclosure, is this Reg hack – prefer the compactness of the iPhone's 4-inch display, the rise of video viewing and mobile gaming on handsets presents a strong argument for Apple to expand its iPhone line to include larger displays such as those Reuters' sources say are coming, 4.7 inches first, then 5.5 inches.

But if they do, may we humbly suggest that they keep a 4-incher in the line for those of us who use our phone as a phone more than we use it as a mobile home entertainment center? ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.