Feeds

Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'

Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Video Google's Maps team has made an early entry into this year's April Fools' crop of pranks with the introduction of Pokemon to the mobile application.

The company said in a video that it would be adding the Pokemon-tracking functionality as part of a campaign to hire a new "Pokemon Master" position within the company. Those who can "catch" images of all 150 Pokemon on their mobiles would be eligible to take the new role of "Pokemon Master" within the company.

To help promote the search, the company has added a new feature to the iOS and Android versions of Google Map which adds the Pokemon-tracking ability. Users can press a special button within the Google Maps screen to locate nearby Pokemon which can then be "caught" with a tap and catalogued on Maps.

According to Google's posting, the "Pokemon Master" will be selected on 2 April, after the company conducts an internal "battle" to decide who makes the hire.

Youtube Video

"We value employees who are risk-taking and detail-oriented, have deep technical knowledge, and can navigate through tall grass to capture wild creatures," read a post to the Google Asia Pacific blog.

"It turns out that these skills have a lot in common with another profession — that of the Pokémon Master."

This should go without saying, but least you still harbour dreams of being an IRL Google Pokemon master, the contest is an April Fools' joke from the Chocolate Factory. As they're wont to do every year, companies throughout the IT and consumer electronics spaces are planning press releases, videos and other joke campaigns to run tomorrow.

Past Google gags have included 8-bit NES Maps and an 'ambinavigation' tool to bring multitasking options to Chrome.

In other April Fools' tedium news, Richard Branson has gotten his Virgin Airlines crew in on the jokes, posting a page touting a supposed partnership with Nest to offer personal climate control to passengers. Options range from "Chicago Polar Vortex" to "Cancun Afternoon". ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Sway: Microsoft's new Office app doesn't have an Undo function
Content aggregation, meet the workplace ... oh
Sign off my IT project or I’ll PHONE your MUM
Honestly, it’s a piece of piss
Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown
.london, .hamburg and .公司 - that's .com in Chinese - storm the web server charts
NetWare sales revive in China thanks to that man Snowden
If it ain't Microsoft, it's in fashion behind the Great Firewall
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.