Feeds

Meet Microsoft's latest Windows Server reseller – come on down, Google

Search king, OS giant team up to take on Amazon

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

GCPLive Google is going to serve up Microsoft Windows in virtual machines on its Compute Engine service as the web giant hopes to dethrone Amazon as the king of the cloud.

Support for the operating system was announced by Google on Tuesday at its Cloud Platform event in San Francisco: the search king will make Windows Server 2008 R2 available in its public cloud in "limited preview," and push Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server into general availability.

These are significant moves for the web supremo, as these are the systems relied upon by enterprises.

It also demonstrated how the rise of cloud computing has shaken up the relationships between some of the world's largest technology companies. Though Google and Microsoft compete with each other on search (Google v Bing) and the cloud (Cloud Platform v Azure) and phones (Android v Windows Phone), that hasn't prevented them partnering up to increase Microsoft's software sales.

We're told Microsoft will sell Windows Server licenses to Google, which will then bundle them with the virtual machines it rents to cloud customers. Google is effectively now a Windows operating system reseller. (It's worth noting Amazon also hosts Windows Server on its compute cloud and takes care of the licensing.)

"We have a SPLA [Services Provider License Agreement] arrangement with Microsoft," a Google spokeswoman told The Reg. "We have two pricing options which makes it easy for developers: one for small instances, all other prices are across the board per core. Most other providers have a lot, which can make it pretty complex to understand the pricing."

This is part of a larger shift that has seen cloud-based technologies proliferate and change how established companies conduct their business. Oracle, for instance, used to make fun of the cloud, but faced with margin-sapping Amazon, it has been forced to start its own – and partner with arch-rival Microsoft as well.

At the end of last year, Intel though a long-time ally of Microsoft acknowledged the death of the famous "Wintel" alliance as it said it would work to welcome in Google's Android and Chrome Operating Systems into its cozy club.

By adding in further operating system to its cloud, Google is showing that even it, a cloud-first company, is not immune to these changes and has to form alliances with its own competitors to take share in the cloud. It's an Alice in Wonderland world and judging by the company's vast price reductions on Tuesday, we're just getting started. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
IT crisis looming: 'What if AWS goes pop, runs out of cash?'
Public IaaS... something's gotta give - and it may be AWS
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.