Feeds

Ray-Ban to produce Google Glass data-goggs: Cool - or Tool?

It's 106.32 miles to Chicago, we got 33.2l of gas, 11 cigarettes, it's dark - and we're wearing sunglasses

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Luxottica, the holding company for pricey eyeware brands Ray-Ban, Oakley, Persol and even Burberry, has inked a deal that will see it design stylish versions of Google's “glass” tech specs.

The eyewear company's canned statement says it will work with Google“ on the creation of innovative iconic wearable devices”. To do so the two companies will “establish a team of experts devoted to working on the design, development, tooling and engineering of Glass products that straddle the line between high-fashion, lifestyle and innovative technology.”

And there we were thinking the stuff that goes into technology industry canned statements was dross.

Ray-Ban and Oakley have been singled out as the two brands in Luxottica's stable to get the Glass treatment. Oakley already has form in wearable tech: its “Razrwire” Bluetooth glasses got us all excited back in 2005 and in 2012 the outfit taaked up “smart glasses”.

There's a big “watch this space” caveat on the deal, with Luxottica saying details of products “will be disclosed at a later stage.”

What's in it for Google? It's emission about the deal says “ Luxottica’s retail and wholesale distribution channels will serve us well when we make Glass available to more people down the road.”

Those retail channels include Sunglass Hut, Lenscrafters and OPSM, plus others, for a reputed global total of over 7,000 stores.

If Glass lands in all of those stores, plus others Luxottica can address with distribution services, that will mean the tech specs are available in an awful lot of malls around the world and will have a service and repair operation ready to handle the inevitable breakages and accidents.

Perhaps all those stores might also sell Google's Nexus devices to help Glass connect to the internet. If so, Google's vision for Glass looks very far-sighted. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Tim Cook: The classic iPod HAD to DIE, and this is WHY
Apple, er, couldn’t get the parts for HDD models
Apple spent just ONE DOLLAR beefing up the latest iPad Air 2
New iPads look a lot like the old one. There's a reason for that
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Caterham Seven 160 review: The Raspberry Pi of motoring
Back to driving's basics with a joyously legal high
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.