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Cisco belches forth mighty intergobblenator CLOUD OF DOLLARS

Intercloud: It's the cloudsome corporate internet of EVERYTHING

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Cisco is planning to spend $1bn over the next two years on its very own cloud computing service for corporate customers.

The networking firm wants to get into the cloud market with its very own "global Intercloud" and is going to spend the millions on building data centres to run the service.

Unlike cloudy offerings from companies like Amazon, Cisco is hoping to get big corporations and government agencies to use their services as part of a hybrid cloud, rather than signing up small startups that don't want to build their own infrastructure.

"In order to move with speed, scale, global reach and world class economics, [companies] recognise that ‘hybrid cloud’ strategies must be embraced," Cisco's president of development and sales Rob Lloyd said in a blog post.

"In the face of this challenge, customers and partners have asked Cisco to do more. And we saw an exciting opportunity to do much more than was being offered in the market by any other cloud provider."

The firm also plans to sell its version of the cloud to telcos, which can then use it in internet-based services those companies sell to others, and get companies to partner in its "Intercloud initiative".

It listed firms like Telstra, Canopy, Ingram Micro and Logicalis Group as early customers for Cisco Cloud Services or partners in the Intercloud.

"Our cloud will be the world’s first truly open, hybrid cloud. The Cisco Intercloud will be built upon industry-leading Cisco cloud technologies and leverage OpenStack for its open standards-based global infrastructure. We’ll support any workload, on any hypervisor and interoperate with any cloud," Lloyd said.

"And this will be a cloud truly built for the Internet of Everything, capable of scaling to billions of connections, and trillions of events, all supported by real-time analytics to help customers get the insights they need from the connections of people, processes, data and things, as they happen."

Cisco is big into the Internet of Everything, as Vulture South discovered in an interview with security executive Chris Young. ®

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