Feeds

Android update process gives malware a leg-up to evil: Indiana U

Old apps get access to privileges that didn't exist when they were written

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Researchers from Indiana University Bloomington have tagged a vulnerability in the way Android handles updates, which they say puts practically every Android device at risk of malicious software.

As ThreatPost explains, the vulnerability uses the update process to “ramp up the permissions given to malicious apps once Android is updated without raising an alarm to the user.”

The research was carried out by Indiana's Luyi Xing, Xiaorui Pan, Kan Yuan and XiaoFeng Wang, with help from Rui Wang of Microsoft Research.

What's going on in “Pileup” – privilege escalation through updating – is this: some permission settings offered in newer Android versions aren't present in older versions. A malicious app – one that would raise alarms in a newer version – can be installed in an older version without problems. It can't ask for dangerous permissions, because those permissions don't exist.

However, because Android tries not to break apps during the update process, an update on the infected device will automatically assign the escalated permissions to the malicious app, without alerting the user.

As the paper states, the attack “is not aimed at a vulnerability in the current system. Instead, it exploits the flaws in the updating mechanism of the “future” OS, which the current system will be upgraded to … the adversary can strategically claim a set of carefully selected privileges or attributes only available on the higher OS version”.

In other words, the attacker compares API calls in a late version of Android, and defines that system permission in an app designed for installation on an older version. By way of example, they write, permission.ADD_VOICEMAIL would be ignored in Android 2.3.6 because it doesn't exist – that permission was added in 4.0.4. The app would look benign until the user upgraded to 4.0.4, at which point it becomes exploitable.

The researchers identified six “Pileup” flaws in the Android Package Manager, all of which have been reported to Google and one of which has been fixed.

“With the help of a program analyser, our research discovered 6 such Pileup flaws within Android Package Manager Service and further confirmed their presence in all AOSP (Android Open Source Project) versions and all 3,522 source code versions customized by Samsung, LG and HTC across the world that we inspected,” they write. That means “billions” of devices are affected, they state. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.