Feeds

BLUE BIRD DOWN: Turkey wipes out Twitter 'scourge'

Erdogan not happy with 'smear campaign'

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Turkish prime minister Tayyip Erdogan appears to have ordered Twitter be blocked in the nation after the service was used to post information alleging government corruption.

Turkish users trying to load Twitter.com were taken to a page with a statement from the local telecoms regulator TIB, according to Reuters.

The statement apparently claimed that four court orders had already been served requesting the site take down content including voice recordings which purport to show corruption in the Erdogan administration.

Another statement, sent to the newswire from the prime minister’s office, had the following:

If Twitter officials insist on not implementing court orders and rules of law ... there will be no other option but to prevent access to Twitter to help satisfy our citizens' grievances.

Twitter rolled out new functionality in 2012, to widespread criticism, allowing individual governments to request that certain tweets be blocked in their country.

However, the firm was obviously not sufficiently quick or compliant with its responses to Turkey’s requests.

In the meantime, Twitter has reminded users in the republic that they can sent Tweets using SMS.

Prime minister Erdogan visited Silicon Valley last May for a tour of Apple, Google and other tech firms ahead of a government scheme to purchase millions of tablets for Turkish school children.

However, it doesn’t seem as if he liked what he saw. The Turkish PM has displayed an increasing hostility to social media as key elections on March 30 draw nearer.

He has apparently referred to Twitter as a “scourge” in the past and threatened to “root out” the service, whilst also raising the possibility of a ban on Facebook and YouTube.

“We will wipe out all of these," he told supporters at a rally on Thursday, according to Reuters.

“The international community can say this, can say that. I don't care at all. Everyone will see how powerful the Republic of Turkey is.”

If Turkey has indeed banned Twitter it joins that other staunch upholder of liberty and democracy, China, in choosing to do so. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.