Feeds

Kick us as hard as you like, RIGHT IN THE CYBERS, says Japan

Government unleashes ethical hackers to prep for Tokyo Olympics

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Japan will today follow the UK’s lead by carrying out a major cyber security drill which will see ethical hackers attempt to infiltrate and disrupt 21 government departments.

The drill is designed to test the country’s emergency response capabilities to the full as Tokyo prepares to host the games in 2020. London carried out a similar operation ahead of the 2012 games.

"It's not that we haven't put effort into cyber security, but we are certainly behind the US,” IT minister Ichita Yamamoto told Reuters.

The exercise will apparently see 50 online defence experts stationed at a special emergency response centre in the capital and 150+ elsewhere to guard against the simulated attack.

Some 21 government departments and agencies and 10 industry associations will apparently be under fire.

Tokyo has much to fret about in the run up to the games, not least the possibility of widespread attempts at online disruption from China’s army of “hacktivists”.

According to data from Japan’s Government Security Operation Coordination team, there were 1.08 million attempts to gain access to government networks in 2012 – an average of one every 30 seconds, up 64 per cent from 2010.

Just a few days ago it emerged that Toshiba suffered an insider data breach after a former engineer with the firm was arrested for copying large amounts of research data before jumping ship to Korean chip firm SK Hynix.

Today’s drill will apparently be the first time government departments and businesses have been asked to work together to deflect online attacks.

He practice is sorely needed, especially inside government. Last week it emerged that Japanese lawmakers are planning new legislation designed to cut through government silos and give more power to the National Information Security Centre (NISC) to respond more quickly to threats.

It will also aim to boost co-operation between the country’s 13 critical infrastructure operators. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?
Stop bitching about firearms fees - we need computerisation
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Redmond resists order to hand over overseas email
Court wanted peek as related to US investigation
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
NZ Justice Minister scalped as hacker leaks emails
Grab your popcorn: Subterfuge and slur disrupts election run up
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.