Feeds

Red Hat touts free beer – and by beer, we mean full-fat OpenShift cloud

If you want more than 1GB of storage per gear, you need to reach for your wallet

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

Red Hat is lowering the prices for accessing its publicly hosted OpenShift software as it struggles to come to terms with the brutal economics of the cloud.

The new Bronze pricing scheme for OpenShift was announced by Red Hat in a blog post on Monday. It means developers can now access an off-site version of the OpenShift platform-as-a-service without having to pay a monthly fee, and instead only pay for the storage they use.

"Bronze brings the real power of platform as a service by making it even easier to only pay for the extra resources you want without a monthly platform fee," Red Hat marketing chap John Poelstra, wrote in a blog post announcing the changes.

Before, developers could either opt for a wimpy free version of OpenShift Online with limited amounts of infrastructure and storage, or a $20 a month Silver option. Bronze provides a halfway-point between the two, giving greater infrastructure than "free", but lacking the Red Hat support options of Silver.

"A segment of the users was either self sufficient or comfortable with the community based resources. We wanted to find a way to provide flexibility to developers who want to purchase and consume extra resources while utilizing community based support," explained Red Hat's Director of OpenShift Online, Sathish Balakrishnan, in a statement sent to The Register. "A large percentage of the applications (1.6 million applications deployed to date) we have running on OpenShift Online are found to have require extra storage for both the application and/or database tiers. Add-on storage gives these applications unlimited room to effectively scale and store data."

OpenShift is a hosted platform-as-a-service, competing with other remotely provisioned software like Cloud Foundry, CloudBees, Amazon Elastic Beanstalk, Engine Yard, and others.

The technology is powered by Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and incorporates elements of SELinux and cgroups to provide security and isolation for "gears", the containers in which all OpenShift apps run, and the fundamental unit of currency for sizing an OpenShift installation.

Under the new pricing scheme, developers can access 16 gears of any size within the Bronze tier, and will need to pay $1 per gigabyte per month for all storage they access above the 1GB assigned to each gear.

In addition to this, users of Red Hat's Silver version, which costs from $20 a month, can now access more than 16 gears per OpenShift install.

Like Red Hat, OpenShift is built with a significant emphasis on open source and, because of this, competes with Pivotal's Cloud Foundry project for the attentions of developers.

Pivotal formed the Cloud Foundry Foundation last month, a cross-industry scheme to bring in more companies to work on the technology. Some of the contributors include IBM, HP, SAP, and Rackspace. This puts OpenShift in a slightly awkward position as it has, so far, not gained many contributions from these companies.

One thing that may cause developers to favor OpenShift is the open-source heritage of its creator.

"From a developer trying to extend the platform, the OpenShift codebase provided much better documentation than Cloud Foundry, but was a bit more difficult to understand at first, because it's split into fewer components. As engineers, we like smaller components of code when we can get them," wrote PaaS software consultants Uhuru Software. "OpenShift gives the user a bit more control and more predictability." ®

Reducing security risks from open source software

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud
Just as Jeff Bezos did to books and CDs, Amazon's rivals are now doing to it
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
The triumph of VVOL: Everyone's jumping into bed with VMware
'Bandwagon'? Yes, we're on it and so what, say big dogs
Carbon tax repeal won't see data centre operators cut prices
Rackspace says electricity isn't a major cost, Equinix promises 'no levy'
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.