Feeds

Spend zero notes to take all notes with OneNote: Microsoft makes app free, builds it for OS X

No ads, cloudy API, but charges for premium features

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Microsoft is making its Office OneNote application free for all users, creating a version for Apple's OS X, and opening up key parts of the API so developers can hook it into online cloud services.

"Today is a huge step forward for OneNote. We’ve made it easier to use OneNote no matter what platform you’re on, and easier than ever to send anything into OneNote," said David Rasmussen, partner group program manager at Microsoft.

"But we’re not stopping here. We’re continually improving OneNote across our applications and service, and working with partners so you can take note of anything and keep it in your digital memory."

OneNote was launched by Microsoft ten years ago and enables users to mix text, pictures and stylus drawings into notebooks. It's popular among students and journalists because it allows the recording of interviews and lectures, the sound files for which can then be navigated by clicking on sections of text.

Microsoft says it has been deluged with messages from Apple users wanting the application, but says the decade-long wait is now over. OneNote for Mac uses Microsoft's ribbon interface, runs on OS X 10.9 and above, and it's now in Apple's desktop App Store with the temping price of free.

The basic OneNote package for cloud users includes 7GB of online storage of notes and audio, and users of Office 2013 and 365 will be able to buy extra features like SharePoint and Outlook support.

On the API front, Microsoft is hoping that developers of cloudy apps will build OneNote functions into other applications. These include the ability to scan documents into OneNote, email directly from notes, and add content from Feedly, News360 and Weave.

OneNote has been something of the redheaded-stepchild of the Office suit (a Redmond PR recently expressed surprise and joy when she saw this hack using it) and Microsoft is no doubt hoping that making it available for free will do something to improve its footprint. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
Apple's OS X Yosemite slurps UNSAVED docs into iCloud
Docs, email contacts... shhhlooop, up it goes
Was ist das? Eine neue Suse Linux Enterprise? Ausgezeichnet!
Version 12 first major-number Suse release since 2009
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.