Feeds

MtGox remedy worse than the disease says Kaspersky researcher

'Leaked database' offering details of Bitcoin heists contained Trojan

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

A 700MB file that hackers claimed contains valuable database information on bankrupted MtGox is actually hiding Bitcoin wallet file-stealing malware, researchers have warned.

Kaspersky Lab’s Sergey Lozhkin claimed in a blog post last Friday that the entire data leak story, which emerged after MtGox CEO Mark Karpeles had his blog hacked, was invented to lure users into unwittingly downloading the malware.

Although the 716MB file features trades.zip, the file actually contains nothing but publically available data on MtGox trades, he said.

The real purpose of the file is Trojan malware designed to “search and steal” Bitcoin wallet files from the victim.

He continued:

We detect the Windows Trojan (MD5:c4e99fdcd40bee6eb6ce85167969348d), a 4.3MB PE32 executable, as Trojan.Win32.CoinStealer.i and OSX variant as Trojan.OSX.Coinstealer.a. Both have been created with the Livecode programming language – an open-source and cross-platform application development language. When the victim executes the application, it looks like the back-office software for accessing the databases of Mt. Gox’s owning company, Tibanne Co. Ltd.

The malware executes TibanneSocket.exe and then goes on the prowl for bitcoin.conf and wallet.dat files.

If the attackers find the latter, and they have been stored unencrypted, they will “gain access to all the Bitcoins the user has in his possession for that specific account”, Lozkhin warned.

A week ago, hackers hijacked MtGox CEO Karpeles’ blog and posted a file which they claimed had been nabbed from the company’s servers.

They said the file proved that the exchange, once the world’s largest, still controlled almost one million Bitcoins despite having just declared bankruptcy.

As interest in the exchange grows following its bankruptcy filing, MtGox has already released a notice warning former users not to fall for phishing emails piggy-backing on the case. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION
You thought you were all alone? Nope – change your password, says ICO
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
Meet OneRNG: a fully-open entropy generator for a paranoid age
Kiwis to seek random investors for crowd-funded randomiser
USB coding anarchy: Consider all sticks licked
Thumb drive design ruled by almighty buck
Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm
Cisco Netflow a handy tool for cheapskate attackers
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence
Download Choosing a Cloud Hosting Provider with Confidence to learn more about cloud computing - the new opportunities and new security challenges.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.