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iOS 8 screencaps leak: Text editor, dictaphone and 'tips' on the way

All sorts of fruity fun lurks within the new operating system

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The first screenshots of iOS 8 have leaked online after being posted on the Chinese microblogging service Weibo.

Although Apple have not officially confirmed whether the images are real, web whisperers certainly think they are for real.

Apart from Healthbook, which is presumably a health app, the new additions to iOS 8 are hardly going to set fanbois on fire.

Here's a tweet with the screenshot attached:

The new apps include Textedit, which is Apple's equivalent of Windows Notepad, a recording app called Voice Memos and the intriguing Tips. This may be a user guide for iOS, rather than a way to offer small payments to Apple, because as we know all too well, teeny amounts of dosh won't get you anything in Cupertino's world.

Other changes likely to come in iOS 8 include better inter-app sharing, which could help to lift one of the iPad's most crippling limitations: the inability to move some files between programmes.

Apple is also said to be adding auto-delete to the Message app, so that old conversations will disppear after a certain time, as well as tarting up Notifications Centre. ®

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