Feeds

Soliton makes its way across silicon in CUDOS experiment

'Intricate' research paves way to glass-free on-chip interconnect

The next step in data security

On-chip photonic interconnects are a step closer, with a successful demonstration of soliton compression in silicon from Australia's CUDOS research centre.

In a Nature Communications report, a team from CUDOS demonstrates that solitons can be both observed and harnessed in silicon-based photonic systems. Solitons in fibre optic systems, for example, have good stability over long distances.

CUDOS director Professor Ben Eggleton told The Register that although solitons are “well established and well exploited” in many fields, solitons on silicon pose particular problems. “Silicon causes non-linearity, which allows the soliton to not disperse,” he explained.

However, light interacts with silicon causing the release of electrons – and those electrons absorb light. So a challenge in making practical use of solitons in silicon-based photonics is to have them propagate across silicon without changing shape.

The second fundamental aspect of the research, Professor Eggleton said, is that the research team, led by Andrea Blanco-Redondo and Dr Chad Husko, were able to shape the light pulses in silicon.

The CUDOS silicon waveguide

The silicon waveguide CUDOS developed

to demonstrate soliton compression

“Compressing the pulse is the foundation of all photonic communication,” he said, because that enables systems in which different pulse shapes can represent ones and zeroes.

“This experiment is laying down the foundation, by elucidating the non-linear dynamics” of soliton behaviour in silicon systems, he said, describing the work as “exquisite and intricate”.

While the CUDOS experiment only worked at a few hundred bits per second, Eggleton said, the picosecond pulse width the researchers worked with means that communication rates of 100 Gbps are feasible.

On-chip photonic interconnect is keenly researched, because using light for the interconnect reduces the amount of heat a chip has to dissipate.

The CUDOS work has been published in Nature Communications. The full paper is here. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Bacon-related medical breakthrough wins Ig Nobel prize
Is there ANYTHING cured pork can't do?
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.