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My work-from-home setup's better than the office. It's GLORIOUS

And I pay less for top-notch gear than my employers. Good, innit?

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Storagebod I’ve been fairly used to the idea that my PC at home is substantially better than my work one; this has certainly been the case for me for more than a decade. I’m a geek and I spend more than most on my personal technology environment.

However, it is no longer just my home PC. I’ve got better software tools and back-end systems. My home workflow is so much better than my work workflow that it’s not even a close comparison any more.

Add the integration with my mobile devices and my home setup is in a completely different league altogether. I can edit documents on my iPad, my MBA, my desktop, even my phone and they’ll all sync up and be in the same place for me. My email is a common experience across all devices. My media? It’s just there.

The only real exceptions are games; it doesn’t matter which device I’m using to do stuff.

And what's more, it’s not just me. My daughter has the same setup for her stuff, as does my wife. We’ve not had to do anything clever and there’s no clever scripting involved: we just use consumer-level gear.

Yet our working experience is so much poorer. If my wife wants to do work for her job at home, she’s either got to email it to herself or use "GoToMyPC" provided by her employer.

Let’s be honest. For most of us, our work environment is quite frankly rubbish. It has fallen so far behind consumer IT, it’s sad.

It’s no longer the technology enthusiast who generally has a better environment: it’s almost everyone who has access to IT. And not only that, we pay a lot less for it than the average business.

Our suppliers hide behind a cloak of complexity. I’m beginning to wonder if IT as it is traditionally understood by business is no longer an enabler but instead has become a choke-point.

And yes, there are many excuses as to why this is the case. Go ahead – make them! I’ve made them myself, after all, but I don’t really believe them any more … do you? ®

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