Feeds

Dammit internet... you promised naked videos of my Facebook friends

Stop riding me, IT guy... I just installed Trojan 'updated Flash'

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Hundreds of people have been tricked into installing Trojan malware after clicking on a new Facebook scam that falsely promises naked videos of their "friends".

The scam – which relies on tricking users into installing a fake Flash player supposedly needed to view the racy footage – can multiply itself rapidly across multiple timelines by tagging the victim’s friends.

In an attempt to skirt detection, cyber-criminals vary the scam messages by incorporating the names of Facebook friends alongside phrases "private video", "naked video" or "XXX private video".

A malvertised link promises videos of the mark's Facebook friends naked, redirecting those who click on it to a fake YouTube website hosting a fake FlashPlayer.exe file. Fake Flash updates are, of curse, a favourite ruse for tricking users into installing malware.

This malware attempts to install itself on computers when users click the fake Adobe Flash Player update. To make the scam more credible, cyber-criminals faked the number of views of the adult video to show that more than two million users had purportedly already clicked on the infected "YouTube link". Another touch of realism comes with the addition of message that the video is “age-restricted” based on community guidelines.

The whole scam is designed to harvest private information from victims, according to BitDefender.

“When clicking the link that promises videos of their friends naked, users are redirected to a fake YouTube website where a FlashPlayer.exe file deploys a Trojan,” explained Catalin Cosoi, chief security strategist at Bitdefender. “A fraudulent web page advises that Adobe Flash Player has crashed and an update to the latest version is required. The malware then installs a browser extension capable of posting the scam on users’ behalf and stealing their Facebook pictures.”

Bitdefender Labs detects the malware as Trojan FakeFlash-A. The Romanian security software maker blocks the scam using its free application for Facebook accounts, which is called Safego. Other safe surfing products are available. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Who.is does the Harlem Shake
Blame it on LOLing XSS terroristas
Researchers tell black hats: 'YOU'RE SOOO PREDICTABLE'
Want to register that domain? We're way ahead of you.
Stunned by Shellshock Bash bug? Patch all you can – or be punished
UK data watchdog rolls up its sleeves, polishes truncheon
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
SHELLSHOCKED: Fortune 1000 outfits Bash out batches of patches
CloudPassage points to 'pervasive' threat of Bash bug
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.